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    Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.lib.ncu.edu.tw/handle/987654321/50658


    Title: Association of Internet search trends with suicide death in Taipei City, Taiwan, 2004-2009
    Authors: Yang,AC;Tsai,SJ;Huang,NE;Peng,CK
    Contributors: 數據分析方法研究中心
    Keywords: MAJOR DEPRESSION;MORTALITY;SLEEP;RISK;SURVEILLANCE;POPULATION;DISEASE
    Date: 2011
    Issue Date: 2012-03-27 17:50:32 (UTC+8)
    Publisher: 國立中央大學
    Abstract: Background: Although Internet has become an important source for affected people seeking suicide information, the connection between Internet searches for suicide information and suicidal death remains largely unknown. This study aims to evaluate the association between suicide and Internet searches trends for 37 suicide-related terms representing major known risks of suicide. Methods: This study analyzes suicide death data in Taipei City, Taiwan and corresponding local Internet search trend data provided by Google Insights for Search during the period from January 2004 to December 2009. The investigation uses cross correlation analysis to estimate the temporal relationship between suicide and Internet search trends and multiple linear regression analysis to identify significant factors associated with suicide from a pool of search trend data that either coincides or precedes the suicide death. Results: Results show that a set of suicide-related search terms, the trends of which either temporally coincided or preceded trends of suicide data, were associated with suicide death. These search factors varied among different suicide samples. Searches for "major depression" and "divorce" accounted for, at most, 30.2% of the variance in suicide data. When considering only leading suicide trends, searches for "divorce" and the pro-suicide term "complete guide of suicide," accounted for 22.7% of variance in suicide data. Conclusions: Appropriate filtering and detection of potentially harmful source in keyword-driven search results by search engine providers may be a reasonable strategy to reduce suicide deaths. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,
    Relation: JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS
    Appears in Collections:[數據分析方法研究中心 ] 期刊論文

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